Isaac Lee Hayes a true soul survivor, was born 78 years ago today in the Arrested Development southern parts of ‘Tennessee’. He was part of the Stax label blueprint writing forces with Dave Porter writing Soul Man for Sam & Dave, and in hit own right with his ‘Chocolate Chip’ and ‘Hot Buttered Soul’ formula forged a career as a singer songwriter and producer. He was responsible for the Blaxploitation movie soundtracks to ‘Shaft’, ‘Truck Turner’ and ‘Tough Guys’.  Isaac also won an Oscar and two Grammys in the 1970s..which was quite an achievement for an African American musician. As well as his musical career Isaac also branched into acting and his voice became a world wide recognised characterisation in the form of Chef from the animated cartoon ‘South Park’. Isaac collaborated with many artists including Millie Jackson, Donald Byrd and Linda Clifford and recorded some of the funkiest and in contrast sensual hot buttered soul and disco with beautiful orchestration on the Stax and Polydor labels. Some of my personal favourites include ‘Joy’, ;Do Your Thing’, I Can’t Turn Around’, ‘Moonlight Loving’, ‘Fragile’, Hung Up On My Baby’ and ‘Run Faye Run’ and not forgetting his production of Linda Clifford’s ‘I Wanna Get Away With You’. Isaac passed away on 10th August 2008 and will always be remembered as Mr ‘Black Moses’..Happy earthday Isaac Hayes with a Blue Peter one I drew earlier Take Hart drawing to celebrate.

Good morning on this Throwback Thursday. Just got these in my inbox one more sleep ahead of the eagerly awaited Rodney P’s Jazz Funk documentary this Friday night BBC4 9pm. These are some of the stills from the filming sessions of the documentary. This is for the first time told from the perspective of the 1st & 2nd generation African Diaspora Windrush children, who for the first time as a collective in the early to late 1970s, felt they could express themselves in rhythm and dance like their ancestors before them, being at one with the music mentally, physically and spiritually. However without seeing it there are already some negative energies from a couple of posts that have been brought to my attention about a big shit storm coming come 22.01pm Friday night and there after, judging the documentary like it’s gonna be reporting fake news. It’s part of a series about black influences in the UK, so the suggestion that it has the wrong people in it and that certain people should either oversee and present it, is farcical as it’s not about you..for a change. Oh the irony especially in this current racial climate, that we as black people have a chance finally to tell our own story from our perspective, on a subject that is undeniably in our cultural DNA and birthright. How dare we???. Anyway enjoy the stills of the dancers, Jerry Barry, Ian Milne, Basil Isaacs, Perry Louis and original jazz funker Carl Cox, Greg Edwards, Jason Jules, Cleveland Anderson and Rodney P.. the countdown continues in just 36 hours just over and two more sleeps peeps..Peace!!
Greetings this Tunesday. Today is a remembrance day for various reasons. 15 years ago in 2005 it was the surreal and horrific day of the London terrorist bombing attack at several locations. On this day in 2006 the very first ‘info provider for the soul survivor’ issue of The Soul Survivors Magazine was distributed at the Soul Village Weekender. Today 14 years later it will be celebrated as Blackout Day universally as a day when the ethos is to support black owned businesses when you spend your money. So it seems poignant to remind of you of the independently and now totally black owned business The Soul Survivors Magazine.
 
It was co founded as a Stevie Wonder and Paul McCartney ‘Ebony & Ivory’ collaboration between Anna Marshall and myself who had both frequented our respective predominantly white and black soul arenas. We had this ideology of a creating a fusion between the two disparaging camps through networking their businesses via the magazine. The magazine kind of took a life of it’s own and over the past 14 years managed to soul survive even through this iSOULated pandemic saga.
 
After 9 years Anna Marshall left in April 2015 and I have retained full ownership and steered this soul boat floating magazine through some quite bigotry, racial and various Bob Marley ‘isms and skizzem’ torrential waters. As a recognised bi monthly printed soul publication amongst two major white owned long running magazines, to my knowledge The Soul Survivors Magazine is if not the only , it’s most certainly one of the very few African Diaspora owned in the UK. Big thanks to all the interviewees, contributors, distributors and readers.
 
Certain documented facts highlighted in the magazine way ahead of the current racial climate, are now playing out and are exposing some of the major ‘movers and fakers’, who claim to love the music but care no where near as much for the indigenous culture it comes from. However we are still here and will be celebrating in just under a months time 1st August 2020 with our 14th anniversary issue. Until then you can for Blackout day go to our website and purchase the limited edition of this first issue or any other issues in the shop. Thanks for reading this and for the support of The Soul Survivors Magazine over the years and Happy anniversary to us…and finally not just today support black businesses as and when you can as if you have the same love for the music. Peace Fitzroy Anthoney Facey
 
Greeting on this June 19th Friday Fitztory morning. There most certainly seems to be an Aled Jones hint of something ‘Walking In The Air’ currently with more disturbing news star side and in the UK revolving around hash tag BLM & hashtag White Privilege. There is still so much to understand and learn before there is any hope of equilibrium peace, but I will endeavour to do my bit to spread the love like butter on hot toast. Most people associate the GAP Band with the commercial classic ‘Oops Upside Your Head’, ‘Outstanding’ and if wanna go a bit left field disco wise ‘Baba Boogie’. I interviewed their front man Charlie Wilson in issue 31 9 years ago in 2011 and he shared some mind blowing previously unknown information about some historical hashtag ‘Black Lives Matter’ history. Read this short each one teach one excerpt and enjoy..Fitzroy
 
Fitzroy : “Why was the band in 1967 called Greenwood Archer and Pine Street Band and later shortened to the Gap Band in the early 70’s?”
 
Charlie Wilson : “My older brother started the group in 1967 which I became part of in the early 70’s. Greenwood Archer and Pine were the three streets of black metropolis in Tulsa Oklahoma where we live. In the early 1920’s Greenwood was full of rich black entrepreneurs and millionaires. It was like the black Wall Street where Wall Street derives from. Everybody on that strip was black and everything was black owned. Something happened in the elevator with a black man and a white woman,where they were both on their way down in a lift. When the doors opened she ran out of the lift to an audience of white people as though the black man had done something to her.They drugged the man and burnt down Greenwood and all in the neighbourhood and there was a riot. Archer and Pine ran perpendicular to Greenwood forming an H again everything was black owned on those three streets. So we took on the name because of the story but the name was too long on the posters if you tried to read it whilst driving by. So we abbreviated to G.A.P. and once through a typographical era, the dots were emitted and the GAP jumped and stood out so we just added the band.”
 
To order the hard copy please go to https://www.thesoulsurvivorsmagazine.co.uk/product/issue-31-june-july-2011/

Greetings fellow soul survivors and welcome to today’s Friday Fitztory. It felt so poignant to share this today with all that is happening and escalating in Minneapolis Minnesota USA with the brutal racist murder of George Floyd. Both Prince and Sound Of Blackness are a big part of the twin city Minneapolis musical and community fabric. Recorded and published 4 years ago in 2016, look at how providential this conversation extract is in relevance of the present moment with the Black Lives Matter movement which as an African Diaspora man, the cause is important, between myself and Gary Hines of SOB. Read and enjoy Fitzroy Anthoney Facey

 
Fitzroy : I’m going to move things up to date with your new single ‘Royalty’ one that you’ve dedicated to the late Prince who supported your work. The song is about up lifting of people of the Diaspora. We know what’s happening worldwide but more so what’s happening in America. We have our version over here, not on the scale of the USA as the gun laws are very different and with less highlighted prominence. I’ve entered ‘Royalty’ into the People’s Black Music Chart as it fits in with the Sounds Of Blackness ethos of embracing all aspects of black music. There is a disparage in the understanding between the black and white communities which is evident when you see some of the social media comments from those who clearly think on an extreme level, justifying for some of the brutality. I sometimes ask myself are we not watching the same video? (Gary: “Right I hear you.”) How is the song being embraced with its timing being paramount right now?
 
Gary Hines: The urgency and necessities of Royalty have a few foundations. About a year ago Sounds Of Blackness released a song called ‘Black Lives Matter, No Justice No Peace’ and that was in response for what has been going on for generations with the disproportionate incidences and interactions with the police to this day. At the time Prince released a song specifying what happened in Baltimore called ‘Baltimore’ and despite people playing it down, Prince was always about the blackness of his people’s consciousness. Prince called me sometimes at three in the morning wanting Sounds Of Blackness to impress upon the youth how important it was to know who we are. That was a genesis for ‘Royalty’ and a local radio station KMLJ brought together Sound Of Blackness and The High School For Recording Arts as we were speaking about collaborating doing a song, so this is all the recipe of recording Royalty. We’ve just released a ‘reggeaton’ version and a video of the song available.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi..here is the replay of this mornings show homage to Bill Withers for those who missed it or who wish to listen again. Also big thanks to the 250 plus who like the Bill Withers post and drawings yesterday. Listen and enjoy Fitzroy Anthoney Facey

 

https://www.mixcloud.com/fitzroyfacey7/fitzroys-soul-survivors-show-homage-to-bill-withers-2am-4am-5-4-20mp3/

Tashan-Soul Survivors
Bill Withers-Make Love To Your Mind
Still Bill Interlude
Bill Withers-Ain’t No Sunshine
Michael Jackson-Ain’t No Sunshine
Bill Withers-Close To Me
The Crusaders feat Bill Withers-Soul Shadows
Bill Withers-It Ain’t Because Of Me Baby
Bill Withers-Lovely Day(Rio Mix)
Gladys Knight & The Pips-Who Is She?
Bill Withers-Railroad Man (Phillip Modern Revisitation Mix)
Bill Withers-She Wants To(Get On Down)
Still Bill Grandma’s Hands Interlude
Bill Withers-Grandma’s Hands
Gregory Porter-Grandma’s Hands
Gil Scott Heron- Grandma’s Hands
Still Bill Interlude
Esther Phillips-Justified
Bill Withers-Harlem
Still Bill Interlude
Bill Withers-City Of Angels
The Beaujolais Band-Ain’t No Sunshine
Bill Withers-I’m Your Daddy
Bill Withers- I Want To Spend The Night
Bill Withers- Do It Good
Bill Withers-Where You Are
Bill Withers-Lean On Me
Bill Withers-Wintertime
Jimmy Lindsay-Ain’t No Sunshine
Bill Withers-Better Off Dead
Bill Withers-Naked & Warm

 

 

Morning all, like many fellow soul survivors I am saddened by the passing of ‘Still Bill’ Withers announced yesterday. Upon hearing I listened to all his albums I had at my disposal and watched again the brilliant documentary ‘Still Bill’. I will be showcasing some of this humble spirit’s music on my show on Solar 2am-4am tomorrow morning. The providential thing about Bill’s transition is that for a couple of years and recently during this lockdown (even earlier this week) whilst I’ve been drawing, l kept meaning to interpret his image from his not to be slept on 1977 ‘Menagerie’ album. So in my self iSOULated Bill Withers confined space, I put pencil to paper and here’s my Blue Peter one I made late but earlier yesterday. A true soul survivor Jedi maestro… long may your everlasting  ‘Soul Shadow’ spirit be cast over this world.. Thank you Bill Withers for your gentle and universal spirit, sharing your gift to the world via music and poetry…Rest In Power ?❤️ #billwithers #thesoulsurvivorsmagazine

Greetings to you on this Flashback Friday. After having to put the magazine on hold due to the current pandemic situation and recent conversations with a few encouraging friends and fellow soul survivors, I’ve decided to use some of my musical experiences, articulacy and creative gifts and remain active, and create a new weekly Blog ‘Friday’s Fitztory’ to ‘Spread Love’ like Al Hudson & The Soul Partners. I’ve been fortunate to have deejayed for (and in many cases later) interviewed various iconic artists over the last 27 years. One of them is the man I call ‘Mr Vibes’ aka Roy Ayers. When the Jazz Cafe in Camden, London (circa 1993 onwards) started to host some of the musical messengers who shaped my musical mind, I was a resident deejay and often did many, if not all, of the multiple dates for the artists who performed. After the show I would go upstairs with my albums to get them signed and chat with the artists.

I remember meeting Roy Ayers’ then manager Dennis Armstead an old school American gent, who would greet me warmly and make sure I got to speak with Roy. I remember when I showed Roy my ‘He’s Coming’ and ‘Virgo Red’ albums. He would point out who was who, and who he sacked because they were indulging in drugs. At the time, I never thought of having ‘Candid Camera’ moments with him or any of the many artists, I was just happy to be in their presence, listen to stories and get my albums autographed. If I’d have had a Mystic Meg crystal ball and have known that in the next millennium I’d co-found The Soul Survivors Magazine, those experiences would have been priceless material. Fast forward like a TDK C90 tape, I did manage to interview Roy Ayers for our December 2013 – January 2014 edition and here is an extract which relates to a track from this Blue Peter front cover drawing I did earlier in the week. Read and enjoy. Fitzroy

TSSM: “I have 4 versions of ‘Sweet Tears’, one from David Fathead Newman’s ‘Newmanism’, one from ‘Let’s Do It’ 1978, the Nu Yorican Soul version from 1997 (with Louie Vega) and the first I believe was from ‘He’s Coming.’ I remember deejaying at one of your Jazz Cafe dates and you saying it was inspired by your Mother, how so?”

Roy Ayers: “Yeah it was inspired by my Mother and my Son whom I was leaving behind to travel on the road. Even though my Son stayed with my ex-wife, whose now deceased, he’d often stay with my Mother also. It was a heavy period for me so the words say “Baby though I’m leaving don’t you cry, I’m the one whose grieving, you know why, love is like the wild bird you can’t tie free to stay forever or to fly, though my heart will always stay, gotta make my getaway.” My getaway was to go on the road to entertain people. Wow, you’ve got a good memory to remember that.”

If you’d like to order the issue this came from to read the full interview then go to: https://www.thesoulsurvivorsmagazine.co.uk/…/issue-51-dece…/

#royayers 

 

I have worked with all of these artist performing on Friday 19th July 2019 @ McQueen. Here is my brief synopsis of the history

 

Dez Parkes I call him the musicologist because of his advance knowledge and experience via his many tentacles he has touched in the music industry over more than 40 years. A proud East Ender who danced in the reggae circuit before he became one of the known characters in London’s Soho club circuit, Dez Parkes is one of the most respected DJ’s and connoisseurs of ‘Just Good Music’. As a multitasking DJ, dancer choreographer and label owner, Dez complied the pioneering ‘Rare’ albums on RCA Records circa 1987. He has travelled the world and is respected world wide via his DJ sets and radio shows. Artists like Leroy Burgess and Roy Ayers regard Dez as a personal friend and seek his counsel as well as giving him props for championing and helping to spread their music. Dez will be spinning an eclectic selection of Just Good Music flavours on Friday 19th July at The Soul Survivors Magazine Awards at McQueen in EC2.

 

 

Marc Mac Marc Mac another fellow west Londoner is a pioneer in finding the perfect equilibrium between analogue and digital music production and compositions. One of the main protagonists of the drum & bass and jungle explosion in the 1990s and part of 4hero, Marc has excelled as one of the UK’s universally respected DJ producers around the world. His label Reinforced is a world wide successful entity with a back catalogue that is constantly in popular demand. Marc has worked with many A list artist and outfits including Roy Ayers, Terry Callier, Jody Watley. Masters At Work and Ursula Rucker. Marc will be spinning variety of flavours on Friday 19th July at The Soul Survivors Magazine Awards at McQueen in EC2.

 

 

 

 

Rose Windross Hailed as the ‘First Lady Of Soul II Soul’ Rose Windross is a unique soul survivor with an instantly distinctive vocal delivery upon any track she performs live or as a recording. Rose is the respected dancer first, singer second, like those recognised as dancers first before they became DJs. Albeit she is an out and out jazz funk disco and boogie die hard, Rose made her recording debut in the lovers rock arena as a teenager before she caught the world attention with her co written ruff rugged and raw London beat classic ‘FairPlay’ circa 1988. Rose has been an in demand lead vocalist on various projects in the soul funk, UK garage and house genres over the last 30 plus years and still boogies hard on the dance floor and while she is performing. Celebrating 30 years of recording ‘Fairplay’ Rose will be our special PA on Friday 19th July at The Soul Survivors Magazine Awards at McQueen in EC2.

 

 

Ricky Morrison I’ve known Ricky Morrison a local West London Wembley music enthusiast since he used to come to my late teenage birthday parties in the early 1980’s, when I used to spin off one deck. Ricky was part of a sound system collective called The System Inc in the mid 1980s and eventually struck out on his own and getting into house music production, one of his earlier pseudonyms was 2 Dope Productions and later on as M&S Productions with lifetime friend Fran Sidoli. Ricky also did some of his apprenticeship working in a few of the west end of London’s premier record shops supplying DJs and music lovers with the latest imports which culminated in co owning Catch A Groove Records along with Abbey Shah. Ricky as well as travelling the world DJing in Europe and the USA Miami Conferences he has remixed many projects as well as enjoying success with his M&S project Salsoul Nugget chart selling ‘If U Wanna’. Ricky is resident at McQueen and will be spinning some soulful house with a disco boogie flavour on Friday 19th July at The Soul Survivors Magazine Awards at McQueen in EC2.’

 

Darrell Steaman

Darrell Steaman is an all round music loving kind of soul survivor. He’s been DJing for around 30 years, an occupation he had no intention of entertaining, however being asked to fill in for a friend it became his passion. Playing initially local in his Oxford manor, Darrell has travelled further around the country and in Europe as well as hosting radio shows with a jazz funk soul and broken beat flavour. He is also well travelled attending numerous events around the country, weekenders all nighters and specialist nights. Darrell’s satirical Funkbox column feature has been running since the magazine started in 2006 and he has also played at previous Soul Survivors Awards we’ve held over the last 10 years. One of the industries funniest and nicest gents, Darrell will be spinning on Friday 19th July at The Soul Survivors Magazine Awards at McQueen in EC2.

 

Dezzi D Dezzi D and I were teamed together in December 1990 by our awards artist PA Rose Windross to work with her brother Norris Da Boss Windross at weekly Wednesday night at Soho Theatre London W.1. Ever since we have worked together at various events and I’ve witnessed his ill skills in the mix spinning an amalgamation of 1970’s to the millennium recordings. He has been for the best part of 40 years a very in demand across the board DJ holding long residencies at various establishments UK and beyond. Ticking the jazz funk disco boogie hip hop, house RNB and broken beat genre boxes Dezzi D will be spinning his flavour on Friday 19th July at The Soul Survivors Magazine Awards at McQueen in EC2.

 

 

 

 

Jon Jules and I have much in common being born in north west London, loving music and supporting the COYS. I first came across Jon buying music off him in the mid 1980’s whilst he worked in R&D Records Rayners Lane. He later co owned the shop and was a familiar DJ character working the home counties and London’s west end. Jon also is a recording artist and a remixer and is very knowledgable installing sound systems for major companies in major clubs and venues around the country. After a sabbatical from the scene he has returned with a vengeance and has made quite an impression securing work around the country and and outside. He was runner up for Best Club Dj in our 2017 held awards at Under The Bridge and is up for best radio show in our forthcoming 2019 event. A very liked individual catch Jon spinning an array of music with a disco boogie flavour on Friday 19th July at The Soul Survivors Magazine Awards at McQueen in EC2.