Today on this Gwen Guthrie ‘ Outside In The Rain’ Way back Wednesday I greet you with this amazing front cover image of a soul surviving icon who had dazzling dancing skills both on the dance floor and on the football pitch. This dapper don looking very nostalgic is none other than the late and ground breaking footballing superstar Laurie Cunningham. He is to many of us from the African Diaspora, a template example of how we can rise from the shackles of slavery, racism and the subliminal and blatant adversity that comes with it. The book Foreword is from the perfect example of how Laurie influenced the next generation of black footballers Ian Wright. Now what is my Kleeer ‘ Intimate Connection’ with this book? ‘ Hold Tight’ like Change as I’m about to share this conundrum.

 

 

I was contacted randomly by the author and journalist and sports editor of The Times newspaper..Dermot Kavanagh, who was advised by my fellow west London compadre and jazz dancer Seymour Nurse, to contact me about 5 years ago in 2012. We spoke on his idea to document Laurie Cunningham a local from north London ( Archway I believe) as a youth, and his cultural surroundings and upbringing. Laurie not only was a gifted footballer, he was also known for his dancing and fashion attire in the early to late 1970’s. He frequented many of the local and west end soul clubs including Crackers Wardour Street .W.1. So I advise Dermot he should speak with Dez ParkesPaul AndersonGeorge Power and another mate Kayanja. Unfortunately Paul Anderson was unable to contribute but Dez ParkesGeorge Power and Leon Herbert did, and their contributions are in this fascinating book.

Over the years Dermot kept in touch and did an event to promote his venture locally in Archway where he Dermot himself comes from. ‘ Movin’ On’ like The Joneses last Wednesday Dermot rang me to say he has published a book and wanted to send me one. It arrived on Friday and I flicked through it as I was getting ready to head for Margate. I saw how much space he gave to Dez Parkes in the book and thought wow! Then I looked at the back in the Acknowledgements and see my name in lights on page 222…double damn. I was truly humbled to be in the same space as Laurie Cunningham, Dez Parkes and Ian Wright Wright Wright. Dermot expressed that me giving him the links to speak with Dez and George really gave his venture a new direction once he was introduced to the underground soul surviving world that Laurie Cunningham was living in outside his footballing domain. I rang him and thanked him and again he expressed his EWF ‘Gratitude’. I’ve never actually met Dermot, but that will soon ‘Change’ like Donald Byrd!!

What is significant is the timing of the book arriving via Postman Pat on Friday 4th August 2017. Not only does it coincide with us documenting 30 years of the ‘Rare’ album on RCA featuring Dez Parkes, it was the eve of Jamaican Independence Day 6th August and the interesting Kypton Factor is this.. Laurie Cunningham, Ian Wright, Dez Parkes and myself are all of hardcore Jamaican souljah survivors roots culturally. To add to that my son Jamal Kin-Foo was born 6th August and shares the first four letters of his name with our cultural motherland Jamaica. This is all providential and not coincidental..a phrase taught to me by Melba Moore when we spoke in 2008. I stand by that phrase all day long. Please get a copy of the book Different Class about the late legendary Laurie Cunningham, as in more ways than one he was a soul survivor!!

In the words of the late Robin Williams “Gooooood Morrrnnning” fellow SOUL SURVIVORS. Pinch punch first of the month, no returns and a Two Ronnie Phantom Raspberry Blower “Plluuurrrrbbbb”. The August edition of The Soul Survivors Magazine has arrived nice and ‘So Early In The Morning’ like Trouble Funk(What a tune).

This months new reviews and interviews features Mike Vitti’s chat with George ‘Bad Benson’ and East London’s finest Dez Parkes​ ,celebrating 30 years of the very first and monumental ‘Rare’ album release on RCA back in 1987. Not forgetting an interview with Mr ‘Places And Spaces’ musical genius Larry Mizell, Simon Law​ and Jan Kincaid​ of MF Robots.

We also have a BRAND NEW feature for those who like their soul music north of the south of the UK, entitled Northern Soul Survivors, curated by our new columnist Les Csonge​ and his partner in rhyme Ann Taylor​. There’s are lots of interesting information on weekenders, soul holidays abroad and a few Micheal Henderson ‘At The Concert’ dates, to diarise and prioritise. To get yours subscribe via www.thesoulsurvivorsmagazine.co.uk and subscribe to receive your Quintessential ‘Info Provider For The Soul Survivor’ for August and a Barry White ‘September’ 2017.

 

Greetings on this mid Bomb The Bass. ‘ Winter In July’ looking Flashback Friday morning. Like the Esther William’s classic ‘Last Night Changed It All’ for me after finally managing to get to see and meet 3 of the remaining other Fab 4 from the home of Brookside Liverpool, Eddie & Chris Amoo and Dave Smith of The Real Thing( the name inspired after seeing the Coca Cola sign in Piccadilly London). I had previously interviewed Eddie in 2011 and spoke with his brother Chris the lead vocalist last year. We spoken on the phone and communicated via email but ‘ Never’ like Centrestage ( great Patrick Adams’ disco classic ) met. Their history is an interesting one coming from L8 Liverpool. Eddie Amoo as a teenager was a part of an all black accapella Doo Wop act called The Chants as far back as 1962 who performed at the famous Cavern venue and massively impressed The Beatles. So much so The Beatles asked to back them and The Chants ended up being managed by Beatles manager Brian Epstein.
 
Fast forward a decade like an old school TDK tape, Eddie’s younger bro Chris co founded Vocal Perfection which Eddie eventually joins and they become The Real Thing. They release ‘Vicious Circle’ on Bell Records and end up on the reality TV of the time platform Opportunity Knocks. Beaten by a yodeller and undeterred, TRT end up having a world wide hit with ‘U 2 Me R Everything’ written by Ken Gold. They worked and toured with David Essex and War Of The Worlds Jeff Wayne and penned a classic covered by MJ Blige, Courtney Pine and EWF’s Philip Bailey, the socially conscious bad by ‘ Children Of The Ghetto’. They decided embarrassingly (management decision) to ‘ Let’s Go Disco’ for Joan Collin’s film ‘The Bitch’ but redeemed them selves with ‘Can You Feel The Force?’ , my first ever bought 12 inch and my fave and underestimated ‘Boogie Down’. I’ve always been a closet ‘secret lemonade drinker’ esq fan of the group and in particular Chris’s Teddy Pendergrass gravel like voice. 
 
The concert at Jazz Cafe was brilliant with women acting ‘Young And Foolish’ regressing like Benj Button to acting like crazed love crushed teenagers. Chris’s lead vocal is untarnished after 40 plus years and Dave and Eddie’s vocal BV’s and harmonies, are like their previous name, that of ‘Vocal Perfection’ The concert was filmed as part of a documentary on TRT by Teddy Bear productions, and I had the honour of presenting the group with the well deserved Best Male Vocal Group of 40 years Soul Survivors Magazine Award from Feb 2017, on stage with them last night. It was great meeting the guys last night and you can catch them bank holiday weekend August at Soul Train in Bristol regardless of whether you’re a ‘Plastic Man’ , ‘Saint Or Sinner’ or travelling from ‘ Stanhope Street’. It’ll be worth it like L’Oréal as ‘ You’ll Never Know What You’re Missing’ should you if ‘ Don’t Go’ as sung by Sheila B Devotion !!

Fitzroy speaks with  Robert ‘Kool’ Bell and Ronald Khalis Bell bassist and horn players of Kool & The Gang who are performing at The Indig02 this Sunday 11th June 2017, the first of a few UK dates!

 

Fitzroy: How was early life in Ohio with you, Robert, being the eldest and Kevin, the youngest forming The KG’s and at what point did you move to New Jersey?

Robert : I left Ohio in 1960 when I was 10 years old and our group came together in 1964. At primary school I met Dennie Thomas, George Brown, Rick West and Claydes Smith. We first called ourselves The Jazziacs. Going back to being a youngster, I didn’t know I was going to be in the music business. I was two years old and my Grandfather had me working with him underneath the car, and my Grandmother would holla “Get that boy out from under the car.’ When I was 7 years old I built my own motorbike by taking a lawn mower motor, and putting it on a bicycle frame. Before we left Ohio in 1960 my brother Ronald and I used to beat paint cans like bongos, and depending on how much paint was inside, this would determine the tone of the sounds we made. When we moved to Jersey City my mother bought me some bongos. I later went on to the bass guitar when I was 14. 

Whilst you picked up the bass and who were your bass influences?

Robert : Spike Mickens our trumpet player and his brother who played the bass guitar, used to practice at their home. I’d go there and fool around with the bass. I could play one song, Herbie Mann’s version of ‘Coming Home Baby’. My brother suggested when we were playing at the Cafe Mar in the village area, to play ‘Coming Home Baby’ on the bass, and I could do that all on one string. That was the beginning of my bass career. During that time Mr Charles Smith who became our guitar player when we joined the Soul Town Band, used to show me how to play different licks. We became the back up band for Soul Town. Soul Town was trying to be like Motown and we had eight to ten artists and had to learn how to play Motown songs behind these local artists, and that is how I started learning my chops. At that time whilst we were the Jazziacs, I was listening to bass players like Ron Carter, Reggie Workman of The Jazz Crusaders on the jazz side, and at the same time James Jamerson of The Motown Funk Brothers on the R&B side.

Fitzroy : Ronald with influences ranging from Miles Davis, John Coltrane & James Brown, where were your early gigs and do you have any memories of individual talent who broke through in the late 60’s early 70’s?

Ronald :  I remember my father who was a professional prize fighter bought home a stereo and I was fascinated at this thing going around by itself playing music.  Our Jazz influence being our first love came from Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Herbie Hancock.  Because I played saxophone John Coltrane and Joe Henderson, Wayne Shorter, Archie Sheppard, Sonny Rollins to Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers we kind of emulated them.  Listening to a lot of Motown we worked with an organisation called a Soul Town out of Jersey City trying to emulate the Motown artist so that’s where we got our muscle in R&B influence from The Temptations, The Marvelettes, Stevie Wonder, Earl Van Dye & James Brown.  Regarding memories At the café Wah, before we became Kool & the Gang we used to frequent there, Bill Crosby, Richie Haven and Richard Prior was there and we used to play for sandwiches. Yeh potato chips ‘Coming Home Baby’ by Ben Tucker and Herbie Mann we used to love playing that, in fact Kool used to practice bass to that!!

Fitzroy : How did you acquire the name Kool?

Robert : Ok let me go back to Ohio. In the neighbourhood we had little street gangs and as a country boy coming to Jersey City, I had to adapt to what was going on. I noticed there was a guy who called himself Cool spelt with a C. I liked that and decided to take the name on as my nickname and spelt it with a K, not knowing that it would eventually inspire the name Kool & The Gang. When we became part of Soul Town and left to work at the Blue Note Lounge in Jersey we decided to make a name change from The Jazziacs. The clubs MC was a part of Soul Town and came up with an idea to advertise us in the window as Kool & The Flames. My name was in a block of an ice type font with the Flames name as a melted one. Our first manager Gene Redd advised we shouldn’t use the name Flames because of James Brown & Famous Flames and we didn’t want to have any problems with the Godfather. We went thorough a few names and decided upon Kool & The Gang. That was in 1968, which will be 50 years next year.

 

Fitzroy :  The sense of black pride obviously had an influence on you during the 60’s Mohammed Ali, Nation of Islam and the clench fist of the Olympic medalist’s.  At what point did you become influenced to change your way of living and become Muslim?

Ronald:  The Islamic influence – well at the time everyone was trying to raise their consciousness, afro and the Afro American experience was all around, I guess it was time for change we were listening to Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Elijah Mohammed speak all this energy for us, John Coltrane being a revolutionary in music, I don’t see it as a change I don’t divide religion up it’s like music is just one note.  I read the bible, the Koran, the bahagamagita and lots of other things.  It just evolved as a way of life and Islam was the only one that excluded none.  It didn’t seem right to me to that the creator would not include all people.  John Coltrane…he summed it up for me perfectly…a ‘Love Supreme’.  I can’t speak for no one else but for me Islam translate into peace in Arabic, Muslim in English means one who submits themselves to the creator, and all people eat the food and breathe the air provided by the creator so I don’t see any difference in how we should treat each other.

 

Fitzroy : Same question to you Robert

Robert : During that time we were still young at grammar school and we used to play for different events. The Nation Of Islam would have an event they called The Bizzare, which had vendors, food and entertainment. We became the band that played for those events and we also did some fundraisers for the Black Panthers around the neighbourhood at the time. It wasn’t until a few years after that my brother and I decided to be come part of The Nation Of Islam around 1971-1972.

 

Fitzroy : I personally love ‘Music Is The Message’ as an album with the title track, ‘Soul Vibrations’ and ‘Funky Granny’ with your distinctive bass playing. How did you feel that the marriage between you and Claydes Smith worked? As with your individual guitar parts, yours are a few simple melodic impromptu notes and not pluck and thumping like Larry Graham and Claydes guitar is a very infectious lead?

Robert : Well we established that at Soul Town doing the Motown tracks and we shared and learned the tracks. Claydes was always simple but sophisticated and you hear that on tracks like ‘Funky Stuff’ especially when they do all the double mixing in the studio. Even Prince before he died said the first record he heard on the car radio was ‘Funky Stuff’.

Fitzroy : There were lots of east coast street bands like Fatback, Brass Construction, Crown Heights Affair and later Cameo cutting their teeth on the street funk. With all their different individual sounds, what was in the air to inspire that creativity and what was the edge that Kool & the Gang had as to why they were so successful with ‘Funky Stuff’ and ‘Jungle Boogie’?

Robert : We were incorporating our 1960s experience as The Jazziacs and what we learned of Motown at Soultown, listening to James Brown and being inspired by Sly & The Family Stone. We established ourselves with jazz & RB influences, which became the Kool & The Gang sound of the 1970s. We carried that through till we changed our sound again in 1979 when we added JT Taylor as a lead singer. I was hanging out in New York and every Friday night was ladies night so when JT became our lead vocalist we created the song ‘Ladies Night’ and now our sound has changed again. We became more pop, with ‘Ladies Night’, ‘Celebration’, ‘Get Down On It’, ‘Joanna’ etc. etc. It became an evolution of our music and we started writing those kind of songs because we now had a singer. Our producer Deodato said “Listen guys we got a singer in the band now and you have to make room for the singer”. We said, almost reluctantly, ok. (Robert laughs.)

Fitzroy : Your writing and productions are typical of that spirited era.  Other street funk bands, Fatback, Brass Construction, label mates Crown Heights Affair, Mandrill, War and the KG’s also fused jazz soul and funk into a ménage I can only describe as musical magic.  Was it difficult to maintain your individual imprint as most of the above acts had a brass section and their own brand of groove? 

Ronald:  It’s pretty much like today in Hip Hop like back in the Be Bop era people were listening to each other.  Our sound was defined I think by the horns because that was primarily instrumental in a street background and the late Charles Smith came up with these incredible guitar line that were almost like James Brown but not quite it.  The way he expressed himself playing those licks on ‘Funky Stuff’ our first record ‘Kool & the Gang’ it was all influence from our predecessors that came before us.  We just carved out what we liked.  I remember when I first heard the ‘Nutcracker’ I was in the 3rd grade in Ohio and that influenced me later to do ‘Open Sesame’ some of that sounds similar as well as John Phillip Souza music is universal.  We’d listen Brass Construction to Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers and Earth Wind & Fire and the Commodores.  Ask Maurice White he played behind John Coltrane, Ramsey Lewis and Charles Stepney.  We listen to everybody Marvin Gaye, Stanley Turrentine, Elton John, and The Beatles The Stones it was all there. Like I said before we had to back up Tina Turner & Temptation, Sly & the Family Stone wanna be’s.  We started trying to make our own sounds that’s when we became creative.

Fitzroy :  Which is you favourite Kool & the Gang album and titled track?

Ronald:  Favourite album was the best recording, it was fun and fondest memory, we recorded it for 6 months that was ‘Kool & the Gang’ by Kool & the Gang. Favourite Kool & the Gang song would be ‘Celebration’

Fitzroy pause’s …Ok …because?

Ronald :  Because everyone around the world has been living the dream and manifested actually.  I had no idea that song would be what it is, it had a great groove on it and we were focused after ‘Ladies Night’ to continue with music as a pursuit. We started covering some tri ad cords like rock & roll and simplistic cord changes.  I read some scriptures where man was being created by god and the angels were celebrating and praising god for doing that.  That’s where the inspiration for ‘Celebration’ came from.  That may be my favourite song “So every one man woman and child human being around the world come on”!!

 

 

Fitzroy : What’s yours Robert?

Robert : That kind of a hard question but I’d have to say ‘Ladies Night’ the first single with JT Taylor because I came up with the title.

Fitzroy : Like most player bands of the time, vocals were not your main strength but you managed to do what I call the ‘hustle chant’ which is more like party lyrics (Robert: “Yes, chant music” (Robert laughs.) You created hits like ‘Jungle Boogie’, ‘Hollywood Swinging’, ‘Spirit Of The Boogie’ and the huge crossover jazz funk disco cut that made the ‘Saturday Night Fever’ soundtrack, ‘Open Sesame’. What actually inspired ‘Open Sesame’ as I remember a children’s program Banana Splits with the Arabian Knights cartoon that resonated with me whenever I hear ‘Open Sesame’?

Robert : My brother Khalis wrote that song and it was our approach to the dance floor sound, which was dominated by Barry White, Donna Summer, and dance records happening at the time. We wanted to do something but make it jazzier. So we looked into listening to the kind of scales of someone like John Coltrane. That’s when my brother came up with the horn line because Earth Wind & Fire was out there doing their thing, so my brother came out with ‘Open Sesame’ with those Arabian scales horn lines. Really my brother was just experimenting and the band said ‘What was that, that your brother did?” when he brought that into the studio. (Robert laughs).

Fitzroy : What was the inspiration for ‘Summer Madness’ and adding the soothing jazzy vocals from Something Sweet female vocalists on the extended live version?

Robert : ‘Summer Madness’ was a vamp from a song called ‘You Don’t Have To Change’ from the ‘Light Of Worlds’ album. If you listen there’s a keyboard change of the song vamping out and my brother said “Hey that’s two songs in one”. One night he had just got the Arp Pro synthesiser and was messing around with it till 5 o’clock in the morning. He took the second part of ‘You Don’t Have To Change’ and put a solo on it with the Arp, then Claydes came and played his guitar and we decided to call it ‘Summer Madness’. We didn’t know that the song would become what it is today with Will Smith getting a Grammy for ‘Summertime’ and other rappers and movies using the song.

 

Fitzroy:  Your trade mark music of the early funk jazz era focused universal love peace, unity and “getting down” with the consciousness like the other “super group” who shared a similar kind of success EWF.  You seem to source your energy from Africa but share its history with the world regardless of their origin.  Was that easy to convince the corporate record company headed by Polydor?

Ronald :  Wow oh how to answer that….In a sense we had a record company that allowed us to do whatever, they saw us a creative energy, entity and source. There were times when it was questioned but they were supportive. But when they asked us to make some more commercial music we decided to. Gene asked us to do ‘Soul Makossa’, our focus became sharper and had already been educated coming through the Motown era how to do that

Fitzroy :  Did you do ‘Soul Makossa’?

Ronald : No we did ‘Jungle Boogie’ instead; right now “Jungle Boogie” is ranking with ‘Celebration’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fitzroy : ‘Everybody’s Dancing’ for me was ‘Open Sesame’ part 2. It’s clear that by 1978 there was some pressure to produce a disco hit, which most player outfits leaders like Fatback’s Bill Curtis, Brass Construction’s Randy Muller and Cameo’s Larry Blackmon, whom I’ve spoken with, agree it was make or break with their respective record companies. How did you recruit JT Taylor to record that game changing ‘Ladies Night’ single and album and end up working with Deodato?

Robert : OK long story short. We were doing a tour with The Jackson 5 at the time and Dick Griffey of Solar Records said he like the excitement we were creating on the tour and suggested we needed to get a lead singer. We’d never really thought about it before but realised it was a good idea as Earth Wind & Fire had Phillip Bailey and Maurice White and The Commodores had Lionel Richie. So we were rehearsing at The House Of Music in New Jersey on another album. Deodato was working there and JT Taylor was working with the manager of who owned the studio. We didn’t go through the auction mode as my brother asked JT to come to the studio and he played him some various chord changes for JT to sing to. We liked him and said, “You’ve got the job”.

Fitzroy : You’ve come to the UK many times, of which I saw you at the Indigo back in 2008 and are coming very soon to perform dates, including with The Jacksons. Now that is a line up of full value for money. Will you be including some of the connoisseur jazz/street funk classics as well as the obvious commercial and party ones?

Robert : Yeah we still do ‘Funky Stuff’, ‘Jungle Boogie’, ‘Hollywood Swinging’, ‘Open Sesame’ and ‘Summer Madness’. We got a new single but not sure about the UK airplay called ‘Sexy’. (Fitzroy: “Ok I haven’t heard that.”) It went to number 15 in the top billboard Urban AC chart.

Fitzroy : Thanks gents

Ronald and Robert :  Thanks Fitzroy

‘Doctor My Eyes’ please do not deceive me as I’m Looking Through The Window’ because ‘Ready Or Not’ issue 70 of the Soul Survivors Magazine is arriving at SS HQ Today and not ‘Maybe Tomorrow’. ‘I’ll Be There’ to on this ‘Hallelujah Day’ regardless of whether there ‘Ain’t No Sunshine’ to greet Postman Pat or Patricia when they are delivered. So it’s as simple as ‘ABC’ to make sure you get yours, the 11th anniversary edition for June & July 2017. When it arrives I’ll be singing the J5 classic ‘It’s Great To Be Here’ loud and proud!! So for ‘One Day In Your Life’ ‘Do The Right Thing’ like Spike Lee ‘Get It Together’ and own one of these special edition copies with The Jacksons celebrating 50 years on the cover. Check out the news reviews and interviews with Jackie Jackson, Keith Killgo (The Blackbyrds), Fatfreddie Morrison, Nikka Costa, Nyree, Ruby Tiger & Jay King (Club Nouveau ).

 

Greeting on this Throwback Thursday..l’ll be going Black to Da Future so to speak, by jumping into my virtual Dlorean, with a return to doing a guest show on Solar Radio this Bank Holiday Monday 29th May 2017. I’m looking to ‘Spread Love’ like Al Hudson & The Soul Partners, with an eclectic selection between 3pm-6pm and will be ‘Coming To You Live’ like Charles Earland ‘On The Radio’ like Donna Summer, so ‘Tune In’ like Pleasure. I’ll be in the mix with my bag of tricks like I have been doing since 1986, so I’ll see if we can open the ‘Request Line’ like Zhane, so for any shouts and dedications ‘Holla’ like Ja Rule !!

 

Here is a collage of photo’s reflecting the before during and after of what was thankfully a very successful Soul Survivors Magazine Awards event, featuring the debut performance of The Brit Funk Association. The first three images were all taken on the night by our official photographer Clifford Irving Snr. The 4th features a mixture from Clifford, Jidi Knee Deep and a few soul surviving David Bailey’s and Lord Litchfields. We Jump back and ‘Do It Again’ like Steely Dan with the venue booked already for 2017’s awards in 2018. Hopefully ‘There’s A Reason’ why you’ll be there for in good ol’ ‘London Town’ for some more dancing and ‘Swingin’ because this particular ‘British Hustle’ ensured everyone attending had a good ‘Time’. If this doesn’t make you wanna go..please ‘Somebody Help Me Out’ as to why??

 

Award Winners and Runners-Up Soul Survivor Awards 2016 – Feb 2017 UTB
The Brit Funk Association debut before showtime and live on stage at the Soul Survivor Magazine Awards Feb 17th 2017 at UTB

It’s very humbling despite the odd disgruntled outcries of The Soul Survivors Awards 2017 being rigged from the initial nomination and voting process’s, publicly and behind closed doors, to share these words of kindness. We experienced accusations and questions including it being a fix, a southern thing, sorting out mates (really?) and why weren’t we nominated?. Despite there being a clear manifesto of how it worked on social media and the website, You tube video’s and various radio adverts, bar taking out an advert in Metro, The Evening Standard or on the sides of taxi’s and London red buses , not sure how the disgruntled ones were not aware. Oh did I mention there was an attempt of bribery too? Despite all the time consuming deciphering and collating the votes and weeding out the spam, we will continue to endeavour and do more to publicise the event for 2018, because we are hard as nails like that. Regardless of those discrepancies, these we some of the many kind words that reflect on how The Soul Survivors Awards 2017 impacted on nominee’s winners, band members and fellow soul survivors. To those we thank you for the love and the support it is much appreciated.

“Hi Fitz, Well done with the event last night. You and your team deserve a big pat on the back.
Kind regards, Robbie” (Robbie Vincent) Soul Survivors Magazine Award winner Master Of The Airwaves

“Hi Fitzroy, I hope that you have recovered from your very hectic weekend and have now had time to appreciate what a successful event you had . Congratulations and continued success to you. Well Done. Greg” (Greg Edwards)Soul Survivors Magazine Award winner Master Of The Airwaves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Runner Up for the best Live concert in the UK in 2016!! First place was Stevie Wonder! Hey I’ll take that praise god!” Howard Hewitt (Shalamar)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I also want to say a huge well done for up’in your game re the awards. You’ve rightly made them a bigger deal and people are taking them very seriously now. Looks like you had a great turn-out too, so very well done mate, be proud of what you’ve achieved, our scene deserves a proper awards…..and you’ve delivered them #beproudandenjoyyourmoment” Bob Masters (Revenge Of The Soulboy & Ibiza Soul Holiday)

 

 
“WHAT AN HONOR!!! AND TO BE RUNNER UP TO STEVIE WONDER OVER MARY J AND MAXWELL??? OMG!!!!! SPEECHLESS…. Fitzroy Anthoney Facey THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH!” Carolyn Griffery (Shalamar) Runners up in the Best UK concert and International act 2017)


“As I slowly surface with a massive hangover, I’d just like to thank everyone who voted Soul by the Jetty the No.1 UK Soul Club outside London again at the Soul Survivors Magazine Awards, it’s fair to say that me, Mark Messent and Brian Kelly are chuffed! Congrats to all who were nominated in all categories and special mention to Brian Rix and Caister Soul Weekenders who won again and the godfather Chris Hill who won a lifetime achievement award alongside Greg Edwards, DrBob Jones and Robbie Vincent. Thanks to Fitzroy Anthoney Facey and the SSM team who put on a brilliant night – it was off the hook!!” (Jonny Layton Soul By The Jetty Winner of Best Soul Club outside London 2017)

 


“Just having a melancholy moment……Thinking about how this very day one year ago I was in hospital after suffering a heart attack (caused by a random blood clot). Now YOU, the very people who got me through that difficult time with your beautiful messages of good will have now made me a MULTI AWARD WINNER!! Thank u all from the bottom of my (now strong beating) heart <3 (I wish I coud hug u all!…..Maybe I will…lol” Georgie B (Best UK Soul album 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

“An absolutely awesome night of entertainment, nostalgia and well earned recognition and accolades. Soul Survivors Magazine Awards ceremony led by the super humble Fitzroy Anthoney Facey was an absolute honour to attend. For me, simply seeing faces i’ve not seen for decades, iconic names that were more mythical and folk legend to me than real, made the event a cut above some of the award ceremonies i’ve attended in the past. Well done to the winners, big ups to those nominees and a massive shout out to those that enjoyed the evening just as much, if not more than I did.” Jide Knee Deep (DJ, photographer and videographer)

“Big shout to Fitzroy and the whole Soul Survivors team Anna B, Fat Freddie M. The Awards show was very cool indeed. I linked up with people I have not seen since Black Market days (91-96) Cleveland Anderson..Bob Jones..Kwame (D-Influence) to mention a few..Thank you to Tony Monson (Solar radio) and Carl Webster (Starpoint Radio), Mike Ashley and Paul Alexander (Soultrain radio). Thanks for letting me know that the KFP-Enterprise compilation is getting a lot of airplay from there DJ’s !! I’ve been asked to re-join or guest on these stations as well as www.nuwaveradio.net . Big up all the winners, some of the real people that put the music on the map. Roy Ayers, Dez Parkes, Patrick Adams, Jean Carne, Stevie Wonder, Chris Hill, Greg Edwards, Robbie Vincent, Ash Selector etc etc. Also Kenny Wellington & the band was rocking…A good night in London !!” (Barry King DJ, Journalist & KFP Consultant)

 

 

 

“Great way to start the New Year. Thank you, Fitzroy and The Soul Survivor Magazine from London in the UK for The Consummate Purveyor of Black Music Award in recognition of my 50 years in the music industry.” Patrick Adams (Disco Messiah music producer, writer and remixer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“After attending The Soul Survivor Magazine Awards on Friday can’t be bothered to watch The Brits, it won’t even come close!” (Steve Humphrey Runner up of best Facebook group 2017 )22 February at 21:09

 

 

“Soul Survivor Magazine Awards. Many Many Many Many Thanks to everyone that nominated and voted. Over 2000 messages of congratulations in the past week. To say I’m humbled is an understatement & I’m still taking it in.” Ash Selector(Multi Award winner 2017)

 


“Thanks to Fitzroy Anthoney Facey Anna Benton John our stage manager, all the organisers, our personal caterers who provided us with and excellent meal compliments of the organisers. But most of all a BIG THANK YOU TO YOU ALL THE PEOPLE WHO ATTENDED TO MAKE THIS NIGHT HAPPEN. XX” (Patrick Mclean band member of The Brit Funk Association)

 


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There was no other way, or place to celebrate my birthday, let me tell you! My group of family and friends were literally last men standing; not wanting to leave. The remarkable still hunky funky Brit Association had us dancing non stop to classic after classic AND it was an honour to witness the deserving award winners, people I’ve admired for decades, being recognised for their achievements/contributions to the ‘MUSIC’. I am a huge fan of the Soul Survivors magazine and I knew that celebrating my birthday, on the same day of their Awards would be perfect (and perfect it was)
Well done Fitzroy, it had to be done and we look forward to 2018! (Tessa ‘Enchanta’ Joseph earthday girl 17th Feb)