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my Fitztory speaking with Morgan Khan



This is a true story first published back in June 2011 which has relevance in todays Pandemic racial climate. I've seen so many closet covert and overt racist and bigots show their Cyndi Lauper 'True Colours' in the past less than a week on social media, that it has become the norm to witness it unfolding from those in the UK, who claim to love BLACK MUSIC. Not that I need an excuse, but they make it so easy for me to show their hypocrisy, especially when things have been documented in the magazine reflecting this 'WHITE ELEPHANT' in the room that some are not prepared to discuss . However I'm a Souljah in protecting the music of my heritage from this kind of abuse. I reiterate again..it's not about likes..but sharing the ugly truth that has been staring us in the face, blatantly, subliminally, covert and overtly..now is the perfect time to tackle it. I do appreciate that some may wish to comment..freedom of speech and all that. ❤️



This time 9 years ago in issue 30 I interviewed Morgan Khan of the pioneering Street Sounds brand fame in issue 30 of The Soul Survivors Magazine. In light of the recent exposure of so called ‘black music loving RACIST hypocrites in their highly and now disrespected positions, here is an extract of the interview, which highlights the bigotry and racism, from someone of the infamous Funk Mafia who remained nameless. This was not for want of me wanting to find out who Morgan was talking about. Like the film ‘They Live’..there are various amounts of these alien types who walk among us. Remember this was 41 years ago 1979 when the subject song came out…



Fitzroy: "Was your break into the industry when you were a plugger or working in club promotions possibly at Pie Records?"



Morgan: "I was asked to evaluate a specific label and their new type of music. So I went to New York and met Joe and Sylvia Robinson and walked in to the studio and heard Sugar Hill Gang’s ‘Rapper’s Delight’. When I heard that record, I’d never been so excited and came back and insisted to Derek Honey the MD of Pie he got hold of that record. I remember taking that record as an acetate to a soul weekender and this is an absolute true story. I played it to one of the Funk Mafia DJ’s who put it on and listened whilst between records. He took it off and frisbee’d it towards me and it hit me cutting my head open. He said “ Never give me shit like this again, why are you giving me this nigger talking over ‘Good Times’ ?” And he was one of the big DJs. I remember looking at him in disbelief thinking he couldn’t see it’s potential, as it wasn’t a jazz funk or what was a conventional record. That was my first counter of the prejudice but I knew inherently inside it was a huge record.Three months later although it never got to number one, millions of records were sold and it still holds the record of the most selling 12 inch single. More importantly it was something from street culture with the talk, the dress and the attitude of the then movement, saying “fuck you the man, we ain’t playing by your rules, this is a revolution from a new generation” and thats what hip hop is. Who would believe nearly 30 years later hip hop would be the new dominant music form?"



To order this issue as a hard physical copy please go to https://www.thesoulsurvivorsmagazine.co.uk/product/issue-30-june-july-2011/

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